MPs call for a reexamination of medical cannabis laws

MPs call for a reexamination of medical cannabis laws

Certain MPs are calling for drug law reform on "outdated" medical cannabis policy, in light of the Billy Caldwell incident.

Billy Caldwell, 12, began using cannabis oil in 2016 to control his seizures. His mother had been getting the oil from abroad as it is illegal in the United Kingdom but Billy's latest supply had been confiscated on Monday. 

Yesterday however, Home Secretary Sajid Javid granted a special 20 day licence for Billy to continue using the cannabis oil. Billy's mother Charlotte has called for the oil to be freely available for medical use, stating on BBC Breakfast "I will not stand by and let any other family in our country endure this experience. It's horrific and cruel."

Conservative MP Crispin Blunt, co-chair of the All Party Parliamentary Group for Drug Policy Reform stated that the existing law were "frankly absurd".

Green Party MP Caroline Lucas, also co-chair of the Parliamentary Group for Drug Policy, said "Rather than cracking down on parents who are trying to help alleviate the suffering of their children, we should be legislating according to the evidence and giving people the treatments they need."

Former Conservative Health Minister Dan Poulter said that the current policy was "ridiculous" and that he would push for a change in the law. 

Cannabis is currently a Class B drug, with penalties for unlicensed dealing, unlicensed production and unlicensed trafficking of up to 14 years in prison, an unlimited fine, or both. The maximum penalty for possession of cannabis is five years in prison and an unlimited fine.

 

Image: CMElixirs

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